Quick links

CITP

CITP Conference - Big Tech: New Policy Environment

Date and Time
Thursday, January 25, 2018 - 9:00am to 5:00pm
Location
Friend Center Convocation Room
Type
CITP

The reach of today’s technologies, and their impact on public life, have intensified debates about the role of technology companies. Companies increasingly find themselves in positions where they have to make judgements that impact large populations. Some commentators argue in favor of more regulatory oversight, while others suggest a more precautionary approach to protect innovation and economic progress. This one day interdisciplinary conference features a range of discussions in the area of competition and open Internet, consumer privacy, online abuse and harassment and the current discussions around technology companies and political campaigns.

Please register on the event site by Monday, January 15, 2018.

Special Event: Dissecting the Equifax Breach

Date and Time
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall Third (3rd) Floor Open Space
Type
CITP

On September 7, 2017, Equifax announced that it was a victim of a major data breach potentially impacting about 145.5 million U.S. consumers. CITP, in collaboration with Fordham University’s Center on Law and Information Policy, presents a panel discussion and analysis of the Equifax breach from a technological, financial, legal and regulatory perspective. Experts from each of these disciplines will discuss existing shortcomings and vulnerabilities that led to this breach, the impact of this breach and recommendations for minimizing future attacks and data breaches. 
See full event details here.

This event is open to the public.

CITP on the Road: Initiative on Artificial Intelligence and Policy

Date and Time
Friday, December 8, 2017 - 12:15pm to 2:15pm
Location
The National Press Club, 529 14th Street NW, 13th Floor, Fourth Estate Room, Washington DC 20045 (off campus)
Type
CITP

This event in Washington, DC describes the launch of CITP’s initiative on artificial intelligence, machine learning, and public policy. The initiative will examine a range of policy issues raised by artificial intelligence, including how to ensure the application of AI is fair and governable; the impact of AI on the economy and jobs; how AI will affect free expression and human rights; how to increase the diversity of the AI workforce; effects of AI on security and privacy; and so on. This event will include introductions to these policy areas from Princeton University experts, and discussion.

RSVP here by Friday, December 1st for a name tag and lunch.

Launch Event - Initiative on Artificial Intelligence and Policy

Date and Time
Thursday, October 19, 2017 - 10:00am to 3:30pm
Location
Friend Center Convocation Room
Type
CITP

Click here to RSPV for lunch and a name tag.

This event will mark the launch of CITP’s initiative on artificial intelligence, machine learning, and public policy. The initiative will examine a range of policy issues raised by artificial intelligence, including how to ensure the application of AI is fair and governable; the impact of AI on the economy and jobs; how AI will affect free expression and human rights; how to increase the diversity of the AI workforce; effects of AI on security and privacy; and so on. This launch event will include introductions to these policy areas from Princeton experts, and roundtable discussions on how to address them.

This event is sponsored by:

MacArthur Foundation Logo

How Should Digital Assistants Help People in Crisis: The Possibilities and Pitfalls of AI and Mental Health

Date and Time
Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 306
Type
CITP
Speaker
Dr. Adam Miner, from Stanford University
Host
Prof. Olga Russakovsky, Center for Information Technology Policy

This talk will not be livestreamed or videotaped.

No RSVP required for current Princeton faculty, staff, and students. Open to members of the public by invitation only. Please contact Jean Butcher at b if you are interested in attending a particular lunch.

Digital assistants (e.g. Siri on the iPhone, Microsoft’s Cortana) are offering to help with driving directions, ordering food, and other daily activities. What should they say if a user asks about suicide or other health crises? As talking software plays a larger part in daily life, and interacts with vulnerable populations (e.g. youth), competence and privacy need to be proactively addressed. This talk focuses on the social, technical, and policy opportunities for conversational AI to recognize and respond to health crises.

Dr. Miner is an AI psychologist, whose research addresses policy issues in the use, design, and regulation of conversational AI in health. In service to improving access to high quality mental health care, Dr. Miner’s research and collaborations focus on allowing digital assistants to recognize, respect, and respond to health issues through controlled and naturalistic studies.

Dr. Miner is an instructor in Stanford’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and KL2 fellow in epidemiology and clinical research, with active collaborations in computer science, biomedical informatics, and communication. He was previously a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford’s Clinical Excellence Research Center (CERC), using human-centered design to create new models of health care delivery to safely reduce national health spending and improve access to care. He obtained his doctorate in clinical psychology from the PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium.

Dr. Miner has provided mental health services at Stanford’s Department of Psychiatry, Stanford’s Chronic Pain Clinic, the US Department of Veterans Affairs, and the San Francisco jail system. His research has been featured on NPR, The New York Times, CNN, The Washington Post, ABC, and The Onion.

So You Want to Design an Encryption Backdoor

Date and Time
Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall Third (3rd) Floor Open Space
Type
CITP

Photo of professor Ed Felten
No RSVP required for current Princeton faculty, staff, and students. Open to members of the public by invitation only. Please contact Jean Butcher at if you are interested in attending a particular lunch.

Law enforcement officials have often called for regulation of encryption technology, to improve their ability to access data when they have a valid court order. This has generated a lot of debate and controversy, but surprisingly little public discussion has been devoted to the details of how an encryption regulation might actually work. This talk will dig into the details of encryption regulation, to consider specific options for how a regulation might be written, how companies might change product designs and users might change their behavior as a result, and how these changes might affect equities such as public safety, cybersecurity, privacy, civil liberties, and economic competitiveness. No recommendation for or against regulation will be offered. Instead, the goal will be to explore the decision space and point toward a more substantive public debate.

Ed Felten is the director of CITP and served at the White House as the Deputy U.S. Chief Technology Officer from June 2015 to January 2017. Ed was also the first chief technologist for the Federal Trade Commission from January 2011 until September 2012. His research interests include computer security and privacy, and public policy issues relating to information technology. Specific topics include software security, Internet security, electronic voting, cybersecurity policy, technology for government transparency, network neutrality and Internet policy.

Ed often blogs about technology and policy at Freedom to Tinker.

Beyond Snowden: Mass Surveillance in the Shadow of Trump

Date and Time
Monday, October 9, 2017 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 101
Type
CITP
Speaker
Timothy H. Edgar

Civil liberties activist Timothy Edgar describes how he tried to make a difference by going inside America’s growing surveillance state as an intelligence official in his new book, Beyond Snowden. Edgar explains how Snowden’s leaks of top secret documents led to reforms that made the NSA more transparent, more accountable, more protective of privacy—and, contrary to conventional wisdom, actually strengthened the NSA by making it more effective. While the reforms implemented by the Obama administration were a good first step, much more needs to be done to prevent abuse. Donald Trump’s election in 2016 prompted fears among both civil libertarians and intelligence officials that a new president would abuse his national security powers. The United States leads the world in mass surveillance. In Beyond Snowden, Edgar explains how the United States can lead the world in surveillance reform.

Timothy H. Edgar is a former national security and intelligence official, cybersecurity expert, privacy lawyer and civil liberties activist. Edgar joined the American Civil Liberties Union shortly before the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and spent five years fighting in Congress against abuses in the “war on terror.” He left the ACLU to try to make a difference by going inside America’s growing surveillance state – a story he tells in Beyond Snowden: Privacy, Mass Surveillance and the Struggle to Reform the NSA.

In 2006, Edgar became the intelligence community’s first deputy for civil liberties, advising the director of national intelligence during the George W. Bush administration. In 2009, after President Barack Obama announced the creation of a new National Security Council position “specifically dedicated to safeguarding the privacy and civil liberties of the American people,” Edgar moved to the White House, where he advised Obama on privacy issues in cybersecurity policy.

In 2013, Edgar left government for Brown University to help launch its professional cybersecurity degree program and he is now a senior fellow at Brown’s Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs. Edgar also works to help companies navigate cybersecurity problems and is on the advisory board of Virtru, which offers simple encryption software for businesses and individuals.

Edgar has been profiled by CNN’s Christiane Amanpour and his work has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, the Guardian, Foreign Affairs, and Wired, and he is a contributing editor to Lawfare: Hard National Security Choices. Edgar was a law clerk to Judge Sandra Lynch, United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit, and is a graduate of Harvard Law School and Dartmouth College.

Ethics of Computer Science Research

Date and Time
Friday, May 5, 2017 - 9:00am to 1:30pm
Location
Frist Campus Center, Muti-Purpose Rooms B & C
Type
CITP

Computer scientists face thorny ethical questions in the course of everyday research: Could my new face detector be misused for racial profiling? Is my web crawler accidentally scooping up sensitive information about people? Inadequate attention to ethics risks undermining public trust; conversely, uncertainty about ethical norms and rules has a chilling effect on science.

This conference will bring together computer scientists and ethics scholars to tackle these questions, acknowledging that traditional research ethics may not easily translate to the new setting. Individual panels will consider ethics in subdisciplines such as data science and computer security, with major themes cutting across panels including how to teach ethics, how to engage with the public and other stakeholders about ethics in research, and what the research community can do to ensure that researchers act ethically.

Please RSVP here by April 28, 2017 for lunch and a name tag.

Internet Privacy Technology and Policy: What Lies Ahead?

Date and Time
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall Third (3rd) Floor Open Space
Type
CITP
Host
Center for Information Technology Policy

Last November, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) issued a landmark privacy rule governing how Internet service providers (ISPs) could collect and share customer data. On April 4, 2017, President Trump signed a joint resolution that repealed this rule before it could ever take effect.

This panel will discuss how we arrived at this juncture and how the Internet privacy landscape may evolve in light of these developments. We will also explore the roles (and shortcomings) of both policy and technical mechanisms in protecting user privacy on the Internet.

Moderator:

Jennifer L. Rexford is the Gordon Y.S. Wu Professor of Computer Science and the chair for the Department of Computer Science at Princeton University. Jen, who came to Princeton in 2005 after eight and a half years at AT&T Research, is interested in Internet policy and Internet governance, stemming from her longstanding research on computer networks. She co-chairs the Secure BGP Deployment working group of the FCC’s Communications Security, Reliability, and Interoperability Council, and chairs the Mobile Broadband working group of the FCC’s Open Internet Advisory Committee. Collaborating with a multi-institution group of colleagues, she has published papers on “Risking communications security: Potential hazards of the Protect America Act” (IEEE Security and Privacy) and “Can it really work? Problems with Extending EINSTEIN 3 to critical infrastructure” (Harvard Law School’s National Security Journal).

Panelists:

Nick Feamster is the deputy director of CITP and a professor in the Department of Computer Science at Princeton University. Before joining the faculty at Princeton, he was a professor in the School of Computer Science at Georgia Tech. He received his Ph.D. in Computer science from MIT in 2005, and his S.B. and M.Eng. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT in 2000 and 2001, respectively. He received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the Technology Review “TR35” award, a Sloan Fellowship, and the SIGCOMM Rising Star Award for his contributions to cybersecurity, notably spam filtering. His research focuses on many aspects of computer networking and networked systems, with a focus on network operations, network security, and censorship-resistant communication systems. His research interests overlap with technology policy in the areas of censorship, broadband access networks, and network security and privacy.

Edward W. Felten is the director of CITP, the Robert E. Kahn Professor of Computer Science and Public Affairs, and the director of the Program in Technology and Society, Information Technology track at Princeton University. He served at the White House as the Deputy U.S. Chief Technology Officer from June 2015 to January 2017. Ed was also the first chief technologist for the Federal Trade Commission from January 2011 until September 2012. His research interests include computer security and privacy, and public policy issues relating to information technology. Specific topics include software security, Internet security, electronic voting, cybersecurity policy, technology for government transparency, network neutrality and Internet policy.

Ed often blogs about technology and policy at Freedom to Tinker.

Arvind Narayanan is an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science at Princeton Univerity. He studies information privacy and security and has a side-interest in technology policy. His research has shown that data anonymization is broken in fundamental ways, for which he jointly received the 2008 Privacy Enhancing Technologies Award. Narayanan leads the Princeton Web Transparency and Accountability project that aims to uncover how companies are collecting and using our personal information. He also studies the security and stability of Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies.

Arvind is also an affiliated faculty member at CITP and an affiliate scholar at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. You can follow him on Twitter at @random_walker.

Joel Reidenberg is a professor at Fordham Law School where he is a leading international scholar in internet law, privacy, and cybersecurity. Reidenberg was CITP’s inaugural Microsoft Visiting Professor of Information Technology Policy for 2013-2014 and a visiting research collaborator from 2014 to 2016. While visiting CITP, he collaborated on research with the CITP community and taught an undergraduate course on internet law and policy, which he still teaches every spring for the Woodrow Wilson School. At Fordham he holds the Stanley D. and Nikki Waxberg Chair, and he is the Founding Academic Director of the Center on Law and Information Policy. He received his A.B. from Dartmouth, J.D. from Columbia and Ph.D. from the Universite de Paris-Sorbonne. 

Diplomacy Meets Technology Policy

Date and Time
Monday, March 13, 2017 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall Third (3rd) Floor Open Space
Type
CITP
Speaker
Julie Zoller, from Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs

Information and communications technologies (ICTs) enrich everyday life and are essential to the global economy. Whether it is the allocation of the radio frequency spectrum for mobile wireless, supporting the free flow of information, or adopting voluntary technical standards, we need international policies that foster innovation and economic growth. This talk will explore how the United States engages stakeholders to develop international policy positions and negotiates with foreign governments to advance tomorrow’s technologies.

Julie Zoller is the acting Coordinator for International Communications and Information Policy in the State Department’s Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs and is responsible for the formulation, coordination, and oversight international information and communications technology (ICT) policy. An expert on technology policy and an accomplished negotiator, Ms. Zoller works with a diverse constituency to shape and achieve U.S. ICT policy objectives at the global level.

Ms. Zoller was the 2016 chair of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) governing Council and headed the U.S. delegation to the 2016 ITU World Telecommunication Standardization Assembly. She also served as deputy head of delegation to the 2016 OECD Ministerial Meeting on the Digital Economy, 2015 ITU World Radiocommunication Conference, and 2014 ITU Plenipotentiary and World Telecommunication Development Conferences and was elected to two terms on the ITU’s Radio Regulations Board (2006 to 2014), serving as its first chairwoman. Ms. Zoller was the Deputy Associate Administrator for International Spectrum at the National Telecommunications and Information Administration from 2011 to 2013 and spent 14 years at ITT Information Systems, where she was a program director.

Follow us: Facebook Twitter Linkedin