Quick links

CITP

CITP Luncheon Speaker Series: James Grimmelmann

Date and Time
Tuesday, November 6, 2018 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 306
Type
CITP
Speaker
James Grimmelmann, from Cornell University
Host

No RSVP required for current Princeton faculty, staff, and students. Open to members of the public by invitation only. Please contact Jean Butcher at butcher@princeton.edu if you are interested in attending a particular lunch.

To request accommodations for a disability, please contact Jean Butcher, butcher@princeton.edu, 609-258-9658 at least one week prior to the event.

CITP Luncheon Speaker Series: Kevin Munger – Clickbait

Date and Time
Tuesday, October 16, 2018 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 306
Type
CITP
Host

No RSVP required for current Princeton faculty, staff, and students. Open to members of the public by invitation only. Please contact Jean Butcher at butcher@princeton.edu if you are interested in attending a particular lunch.

“Clickbait” has become a dominant form of online media, with headlines designed to entice people to click becoming the norm. The propensity to “fall for” this strategy is not evenly distributed across relevant political demographics or popular sources of survey experiment subjects, so the present study presents the results of a pair of experiments: one conducted using Facebook ads that explicitly target people with a high preference for clickbait, the other using a sample recruited from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. We estimate subjects’ individual-level preference for clickbait, and randomly assign some to read clickbait or traditional headlines. We find that older people, people who read more online news and people who lean Republican have a higher “preference for clickbait,” but find no evidence that assignment to read clickbait headlines drives affective polarization, information retention or trust in media. However, we argue that the Mechanical Turk sample is essentially useless because it contains no one below a certain threshold of digital literacy; the Facebook sample does contain subjects from this relevant population, but our survey instrument posed such a technical challenge to these subjects that only a (non-random) minority of those who began the survey finished it. We conclude with a discussion of strategies for studying problematic online behavior among low digital-literacy populations.

Bio:
Kevin Munger received his PhD in politics at New York University in 2018, where he was also a member of the Social Media and Political Participation (SMaPP) lab. His dissertation studies the political implications of new forms of communication enabled by the internet and social media. This work involves developing innovative methods for performing online behavioral experiments and creating new ways to use text as data. His research analyzes the way that new media technologies have changed elite political communication and mass political behavior in the US. He is a visiting fellow at the Princeton University Center for the Study of Democratic Politics in 2018-19 before starting as an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at Penn State University.


To request accommodations for a disability, please contact Jean Butcher, butcher@princeton.edu, 609-258-9658 at least one week prior to the event.

CITP Luncheon Speaker Series: Robert Seamans

Date and Time
Tuesday, October 9, 2018 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 306
Type
CITP
Speaker
Robert Seamans, from New York University
Host

No RSVP required for current Princeton faculty, staff, and students. Open to members of the public by invitation only. Please contact Jean Butcher at butcher@princeton.edu if you are interested in attending a particular lunch.

Bio:
Robert Seamans is an associate professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business. He recently completed a one year appointment as a senior economist on President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisors where he worked on a wide range of policies relating to technology, innovation and competition policy. Professor Seamans’ research focuses on how technology affects strategic interactions between firms, affects incentives to innovate, and ultimately shapes market outcomes. His research has been published in leading academic journals and has been cited in multiple outlets including The Atlantic, Forbes, Harvard Business Review, The New York Times, Wall Street Journal and others. Professor Seamans received his B.A. from Reed College, his M.B.A. from the Yale School of Management, his M.A. in Economics from Boston University and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.


To request accommodations for a disability, please contact Jean Butcher, butcher@princeton.edu, 609-258-9658 at least one week prior to the event.

CITP Lecture Series: Sam Wang – Fixing Bugs in Democracy: The Road Ahead for Gerrymandering Reform

Date and Time
Monday, October 8, 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 101
Type
CITP
Host

Gerrymandering, which occurs in district-based legislative systems, is defined as the drawing of boundaries to protect or target an individual or a group. In the United States, partisan gerrymandering has distorted representation to all-time modern highs. Data analysis and computing, which powered the original offenses, can also be harnessed for diagnosis and prevention. Diagnosis, which can help state and federal courts, can be as simple as a t-test, or as complex as the automated exploration of billions of plans. Prevention requires the ability to draw plans and predict their consequences. With the right open data and software, reformers and interested citizens can get involved in the redistricting process. This talk will describe the road to reform from a data-analytic perspective, and ask how data science can help terminate gerrymandering.

Bio:
Sam Wang is a professor of neuroscience and molecular biology. In 2004 he did the first probabilistic aggregation of state Presidential polls, at what eventually became the Princeton Election Consortium (election.princeton.edu). He has expanded his work to redistricting and gerrymandering, and now runs the Princeton Gerrymandering Project (gerrymander.princeton.edu). His statistical analysis has appeared in the Stanford Law Review and the New York Times, and has been cited by the U.S. Supreme Court.
 

To request accommodations for a disability, please contact Jean Butcher, butcher@princeton.edu, 609-258-9658 at least one week prior to the event.

CITP Luncheon Speaker Series: Lea Kissner

Date and Time
Tuesday, October 2, 2018 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 306
Type
CITP
Speaker
Lea Kissner
Host

No RSVP required for current Princeton faculty, staff, and students. Open to members of the public by invitation only. Please contact Jean Butcher at butcher@princeton.edu if you are interested in attending a particular lunch.

To request accommodations for a disability, please contact Jean Butcher, butcher@princeton.edu, 609-258-9658 at least one week prior to the event.

CITP Luncheon Speaker Series: Danit Gal – The Co-Evolution of Humans and Robots in East Asia: A Regional Outlook

Date and Time
Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 306
Type
CITP
Speaker
Danit Gal, from Keio University Global Research Institute
Host

Humans and technological artifacts have always been entangled in a co-evolutional relationship, where the progress of the one fuels the progress of the other in a (positive or otherwise) continuous cycle. How far can and will this cycle go when our technological artifacts become increasingly autonomous? East Asia’s rapidly developing technology ecosystem offers some intriguing answers to this question. Distinct as they are, China, Japan, and South Korea are all racing towards the creation of a digitally-enabled society by welcoming robots into their lives and homes. Why is this happening? How does it affect an increasingly fragile co-evolutionary cycle?

Bio:
Danit Gal is a project assistant professor at the Cyber Civilization Research Center at the Keio University Global Research Institute in Tokyo, Japan. She is interested in global strategic technology planning to maximize shared social benefit. Danit chairs the IEEE P7009 standard on the Fail-Safe Design of Autonomous and Semi-Autonomous Systems and sits on the executive committee of the IEEE Global Initiative for Ethical Considerations in Autonomous and Intelligent Systems. She is an affiliate at the Center for Information Technology Policy at Princeton University and associate fellow at the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence at the University of Cambridge. Prior to joining Keio, Danit was a Yenching Scholar at Peking University and international strategic advisor to the iCenter at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. Among her current projects is an ongoing study of the unanticipated consequences of conversational AI under the Association of Pacific Rim Universities – Google research project ‘AI for Everyone: Building Trust in and Benefiting from the Technology’.

CITP Luncheon Speaker Series: Ed Felten

Date and Time
Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 306
Type
CITP
Host

No RSVP required for current Princeton faculty, staff, and students. Open to members of the public by invitation only. Please contact Jean Butcher at butcher@princeton.edu if you are interested in attending a particular lunch.

Bio:
Ed is the director of CITP and served at the White House as the deputy U.S. chief technology officer from June 2015 to January 2017. Ed was also the first chief technologist for the Federal Trade Commission from January 2011 until September 2012. His research interests include computer security and privacy, and public policy issues relating to information technology. Specific topics include software security, Internet security, electronic voting, cybersecurity policy, technology for government transparency, network neutrality and Internet policy.

Ed often blogs about technology and policy at Freedom to Tinker.
 

To request accommodations for a disability, please contact Jean Butcher, butcher@princeton.edu, 609-258-9658 at least one week prior to the event.

Hackathon - CITP and Siemens Corporate Technology FutureMakers Challenge

Date and Time
Saturday, April 28, 2018 - 8:00am to 6:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall Third (3rd) Floor Open Space
Type
CITP
Host

This event is open ONLY to pre-registered Princeton University students.

Siemens and CITP are joining forces to sponsor this Hackathon, to be held on Friday, April 13 and Saturday, April 14 in Sherrerd Hall. Siemens FutureMakers Challenge: Making Innovation to Society Real is a 24-hour challenge with a presentation/judging period following the Hackathon.

At Princeton University, participants will be working with the following topic:
Protecting industrial businesses with smart cyber threat & anomaly detection, prevention technology and analytics.

Teams should consist of 2-5 Princeton University students. All teams should have at least 1 Ph.D. student from Princeton University. First, second, and third place team members will receive prizes. Plus, there will be a 6-month research contract for winning team idea! For additional information, click here.

Hackathon Information Session

Date and Time
Wednesday, April 18, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 306
Type
CITP

CITP, along with Siemens Corporate Technology, will be hosting a hackathon for Princeton University students on Friday and Saturday, April 27-28, 2018.

Topic: Protecting industrial businesses with smart cyber threat & anomaly detection, prevention technology and analytics.

Student information sessions about the hackathon will be held on:
• Wednesday, April 18th, 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. in 306 Sherrerd Hall
• Friday, April 20th, 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. in 306 Sherrerd Hall (make-up day, only if neeeded)
Students interested in attending the information session should RSVP to Jean Butcher, butcher@princeton.edu
This hackathon requires pre-registration and will be held from 6 p.m. Friday, April 27th until 6 p.m. Saturday, April 28th in Sherrerd Hall. Siemens FutureMakers Challenge: Making Innovation to Society Real is a 24-hour challenge with a presentation/judging period following the Hackathon.

First, second, and third place team members will receive prizes. Plus, there will be a 6-month research contract for the winning team! For additional information, click here.

Hackathon - CITP and Siemens Corporate Technology FutureMakers Challenge

Date and Time
Friday, April 27, 2018 - 6:00pm to 11:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall Third (3rd) Floor Open Space
Type
CITP
Host

This event is open ONLY to pre-registered Princeton University students.

Siemens and CITP are joining forces to sponsor this Hackathon, to be held on Friday, April 13 and Saturday, April 14 in Sherrerd Hall. Siemens FutureMakers Challenge: Making Innovation to Society Real is a 24-hour challenge with a presentation/judging period following the Hackathon.

At Princeton University, participants will be working with the following topic:
Protecting industrial businesses with smart cyber threat & anomaly detection, prevention technology and analytics.

Teams should consist of 2-5 Princeton University students. All teams should have at least 1 Ph.D. student from Princeton University. First, second, and third place team members will receive prizes. Plus, there will be a 6-month research contract for winning team idea! For additional information, click here.

Follow us: Facebook Twitter Linkedin