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CITP

Automation Challenges for Autonomous Vehicles

Date and Time
Tuesday, April 23, 2019 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Location
Friend Center Convocation Room
Type
CITP
Speaker
Christopher A. Hart, from Hart Solutions LLC
Host

Nearly 40,000 people are killed in the U.S. every year in motor vehicle crashes. Experts estimate that more than 90% of motor vehicle crashes involve human error, and the theory is that by replacing human drivers with automation, this tragic human toll will largely be eliminated. While this theory is overly simplistic, automation can potentially save tens of thousands of lives a year.

There are many lessons that can and should be applied to autonomous vehicles (AVs) that have been learned from decades of automation in aviation. Moreover, because automation on our streets and highways will be far more challenging than automation in aviation, there are several automation issues that the AV industry will face that have not already been encountered in aviation.

A large percentage of the public is already very skeptical about automation in cars. With so many lives being lost every year, it would be very unfortunate to delay the implementation of automation by having crashes that could have been avoided by paying more attention to aviation automation lessons learned in the past and by being more diligent about addressing non-aviation automation challenges.

Bio:
Christopher A. Hart is the founder of Hart Solutions LLC, a consulting firm that applies transportation safety lessons learned to improving safety in other contexts, such as autonomous vehicles and workplace safety.

Prior to that Christpoher was a member of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) from 2009 until January 2018, where he served as chairman, vice chairman, and member. The NTSB investigates major transportation accidents, determines probable cause, and makes recommendations to prevent recurrences.

Christopher has served in senior positions at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), he was deputy administrator for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), and he has served in a variety of legal positions.

Christopher has a law degree from Harvard Law School and Master’s and Bachelor’s Degrees in Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University. He is a member of the District of Columbia Bar and the Lawyer-Pilots Bar Association.

To request accommodations for a disability, please contact Jean Butcher, butcher@princeton.edu, 609-258-9658 at least one week prior to the event.

Net Neutrality, 5G Policy and Finance: A Discussion with FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel

Date and Time
Wednesday, December 5, 2018 - 12:15pm to 1:15pm
Location
Robertson Hall 016
Type
CITP
Host

Seats are limited, RSVP required.
This talk will be livestreamed on Media Central Live.

This talk is co-sponsored with the Julis-Rabinowitz Center for Public Policy & Finance.

A discussion about net neutrality, 5G policy, and financial considerations with Federal Communications Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel and Nick Feamster, Professor of Computer Science and Deputy Director of Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy.

Bio:
Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel believes that the future belongs to the connected. She works to promote greater opportunity, accessibility, and affordability in our communications services in order to ensure that all Americans get a fair shot at 21st century success. She values expanding opportunity through technology and finding creative solutions to our most pressing policy questions.

From fighting to protect net neutrality to ensuring access to the internet for students caught in the Homework Gap, Jessica has been a consistent champion for connectivity. She is a leader in spectrum policy, developing new ways to support wireless services from Wi-Fi to video and the internet of things. She is also a responsible for developing policies to help expand the reach of broadband to schools, libraries, hospitals, and households across the country.

Named as one of POLITICO’s 50 Politicos to Watch, Jessica brings over two decades of communications policy experience and public service to the FCC. Prior to joining the agency, she served as Senior Communications Counsel for the United States Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, under the leadership of Senator John D. Rockefeller IV and Senator Daniel Inouye. Before entering public service, Jessica practiced communications law in Washington, DC. She is a graduate of Wesleyan University and New York University School of Law.

Nick Feamster is the deputy director of CITP and a professor in the Department of Computer Science at Princeton University. Before joining the faculty at Princeton, he was a professor in the School of Computer Science at Georgia Tech. He received his Ph.D. in computer science from MIT in 2005, and his S.B. and M.Eng. degrees in electrical engineering and computer science from MIT in 2000 and 2001, respectively. He received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the Technology Review “TR35” award, a Sloan Fellowship, and the SIGCOMM Rising Star Award for his contributions to cybersecurity, notably spam filtering. His research focuses on many aspects of computer networking and networked systems, with a focus on network operations, network security, and censorship-resistant communication systems. His research interests overlap with technology policy in the areas of censorship, broadband access networks, and network security and privacy.

CITP Luncheon Speaker Series: Christopher Kirchhoff – When the Pentagon Meets Silicon Valley: The Story of Defense Innovation Unit X

Date and Time
Tuesday, November 13, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 306
Type
CITP
Host

No RSVP required for current Princeton faculty, staff, and students. Open to members of the public by invitation only. Please contact Jean Butcher at butcher@princeton.edu if you are interested in attending a particular lunch.

Defense Innovation Unit Experimental (DIUx) was founded to harness commercial technology from start-ups for national security innovation. This is the story of how DIUx at first failed, was rebooted, and eventually succeeded in partnering with leading hardware and software startups amidst a new age of strategic competition in which technological diffusion has made the world ever flatter and more potentially dangerous.

Bio:
Christopher Kirchhoff currently leads the Schmidt Futures Challenges Project, a generational effort to harness the power of technology and science to solve the biggest challenges facing humanity. A strategist in emerging technology, Kirchhoff previously created and led the Pentagon’s Silicon Valley Office, Defense Innovation Unit X, was director for strategic planning at the NSC, special assistant to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and senior advisor to Presidential Counselor John Podesta. He graduated in History & Science from Harvard College and holds a doctorate in politics from Cambridge University, where he was a Gates Scholar.

To request accommodations for a disability, please contact Jean Butcher, butcher@princeton.edu, 609-258-9658 at least one week prior to the event.

Election Security Panel Discussion

Date and Time
Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location
Friend Center 006
Type
CITP
Host

Members of the Princeton University community receive priority; members of the public are welcome if space is available.

This event will be livestreamed on Media Central Live.

As the country prepares for the mid-term elections this November, state and local election administrators are trying to understand the kinds of threats election systems face today and how best to prepare for them. CITP will present a panel discussion where our election system experts discuss existing vulnerabilities, and how election administrators can defend against these threats. Our experts will outline best practices and what we can do to secure our elections.

Moderator:
Ed Felten

Edward W. Felten is the Robert E. Kahn Professor of Computer Science and Public Affairs and the founding director of Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy. In 2011-12 he served as the first chief technologist for the Federal Trade Commission. His research interests include computer security and privacy, especially relating to media and consumer products; and technology law and policy. He has published about 80 papers in the research literature and two books. His research on topics such as web security, copyright and copy protection, and electronic voting has been covered extensively in the popular press. His weblog, at freedom-to-tinker.com, is widely read for its commentary on technology, law and policy.
Ed is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a fellow of the ACM. He has testified at House and Senate committee hearings on privacy, electronic voting and digital television. In 2004, Scientific American magazine named him to its list of 50 worldwide science and technology leaders.

Panelists:
Andrew Appel

Andrew Appel is Eugene Higgins Professor Computer Science, and served from 2009-2015 as Chair of the department. His research is in software verification, computer security, programming languages and compilers, and technology policy. He received his A.B. summa cum laude in physics from Princeton in 1981, and his Ph.D. in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1985. Professor Appel has been editor in chief of ACM Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems and is a fellow of the ACM (Association for Computing Machinery). He has worked on fast N-body algorithms (1980s), Standard ML of New Jersey (1990s), Foundational Proof-Carrying Code (2000s), and the Verified Software Toolchain (2010s).

Jonathan Mayer
Jonathan is an assistant professor of computer science and public affairs at Princeton University. Before joining the Princeton faculty, Jonathan served as the technology law and policy advisor to United States Senator Kamala Harris and as the chief technologist of the Federal Communications Commission Enforcement Bureau. Jonathan’s research centers on the intersection of technology and law, with emphasis on national security, criminal procedure, and consumer privacy. Jonathan is both a computer scientist and a lawyer, and he holds a Ph.D. in computer science from Stanford University and a J.D. from Stanford Law School.

Marian K. Schneider
As the president of Verified Voting, Marian Schneider brings a strong grounding in the legal and constitutional elements governing voting rights and elections, as well as experience in election administration at the state level. Immediately before becoming president of Verified Voting, Marian served as special advisor to Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf on Election Policy. Previously, Governor Wolf appointed her as the deputy secretary for elections and administration in the Pennsylvania Department of State where she served from February 2015 until May 2017.
Marian received her J.D. from The George Washington University, where she was a member of the Law Review, and earned her B.A. degree cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania.

To request accommodations for a disability, please contact Jean Butcher, butcher@princeton.edu, 609-258-9658 at least one week prior to the event

CITP Luncheon Speaker Series: James Grimmelmann

Date and Time
Tuesday, November 6, 2018 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 306
Type
CITP
Speaker
James Grimmelmann, from Cornell University
Host

No RSVP required for current Princeton faculty, staff, and students. Open to members of the public by invitation only. Please contact Jean Butcher at butcher@princeton.edu if you are interested in attending a particular lunch.

To request accommodations for a disability, please contact Jean Butcher, butcher@princeton.edu, 609-258-9658 at least one week prior to the event.

CITP Luncheon Speaker Series: Kevin Munger – Clickbait

Date and Time
Tuesday, October 16, 2018 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 306
Type
CITP
Host

No RSVP required for current Princeton faculty, staff, and students. Open to members of the public by invitation only. Please contact Jean Butcher at butcher@princeton.edu if you are interested in attending a particular lunch.

“Clickbait” has become a dominant form of online media, with headlines designed to entice people to click becoming the norm. The propensity to “fall for” this strategy is not evenly distributed across relevant political demographics or popular sources of survey experiment subjects, so the present study presents the results of a pair of experiments: one conducted using Facebook ads that explicitly target people with a high preference for clickbait, the other using a sample recruited from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. We estimate subjects’ individual-level preference for clickbait, and randomly assign some to read clickbait or traditional headlines. We find that older people, people who read more online news and people who lean Republican have a higher “preference for clickbait,” but find no evidence that assignment to read clickbait headlines drives affective polarization, information retention or trust in media. However, we argue that the Mechanical Turk sample is essentially useless because it contains no one below a certain threshold of digital literacy; the Facebook sample does contain subjects from this relevant population, but our survey instrument posed such a technical challenge to these subjects that only a (non-random) minority of those who began the survey finished it. We conclude with a discussion of strategies for studying problematic online behavior among low digital-literacy populations.

Bio:
Kevin Munger received his PhD in politics at New York University in 2018, where he was also a member of the Social Media and Political Participation (SMaPP) lab. His dissertation studies the political implications of new forms of communication enabled by the internet and social media. This work involves developing innovative methods for performing online behavioral experiments and creating new ways to use text as data. His research analyzes the way that new media technologies have changed elite political communication and mass political behavior in the US. He is a visiting fellow at the Princeton University Center for the Study of Democratic Politics in 2018-19 before starting as an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at Penn State University.


To request accommodations for a disability, please contact Jean Butcher, butcher@princeton.edu, 609-258-9658 at least one week prior to the event.

CITP Luncheon Speaker Series: Robert Seamans

Date and Time
Tuesday, October 9, 2018 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 306
Type
CITP
Speaker
Robert Seamans, from New York University
Host

No RSVP required for current Princeton faculty, staff, and students. Open to members of the public by invitation only. Please contact Jean Butcher at butcher@princeton.edu if you are interested in attending a particular lunch.

Bio:
Robert Seamans is an associate professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business. He recently completed a one year appointment as a senior economist on President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisors where he worked on a wide range of policies relating to technology, innovation and competition policy. Professor Seamans’ research focuses on how technology affects strategic interactions between firms, affects incentives to innovate, and ultimately shapes market outcomes. His research has been published in leading academic journals and has been cited in multiple outlets including The Atlantic, Forbes, Harvard Business Review, The New York Times, Wall Street Journal and others. Professor Seamans received his B.A. from Reed College, his M.B.A. from the Yale School of Management, his M.A. in Economics from Boston University and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.


To request accommodations for a disability, please contact Jean Butcher, butcher@princeton.edu, 609-258-9658 at least one week prior to the event.

CITP Lecture Series: Sam Wang – Fixing Bugs in Democracy: The Road Ahead for Gerrymandering Reform

Date and Time
Monday, October 8, 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 101
Type
CITP
Host

Gerrymandering, which occurs in district-based legislative systems, is defined as the drawing of boundaries to protect or target an individual or a group. In the United States, partisan gerrymandering has distorted representation to all-time modern highs. Data analysis and computing, which powered the original offenses, can also be harnessed for diagnosis and prevention. Diagnosis, which can help state and federal courts, can be as simple as a t-test, or as complex as the automated exploration of billions of plans. Prevention requires the ability to draw plans and predict their consequences. With the right open data and software, reformers and interested citizens can get involved in the redistricting process. This talk will describe the road to reform from a data-analytic perspective, and ask how data science can help terminate gerrymandering.

Bio:
Sam Wang is a professor of neuroscience and molecular biology. In 2004 he did the first probabilistic aggregation of state Presidential polls, at what eventually became the Princeton Election Consortium (election.princeton.edu). He has expanded his work to redistricting and gerrymandering, and now runs the Princeton Gerrymandering Project (gerrymander.princeton.edu). His statistical analysis has appeared in the Stanford Law Review and the New York Times, and has been cited by the U.S. Supreme Court.
 

To request accommodations for a disability, please contact Jean Butcher, butcher@princeton.edu, 609-258-9658 at least one week prior to the event.

CITP Luncheon Speaker Series: Lea Kissner

Date and Time
Tuesday, October 2, 2018 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 306
Type
CITP
Speaker
Lea Kissner
Host

No RSVP required for current Princeton faculty, staff, and students. Open to members of the public by invitation only. Please contact Jean Butcher at butcher@princeton.edu if you are interested in attending a particular lunch.

To request accommodations for a disability, please contact Jean Butcher, butcher@princeton.edu, 609-258-9658 at least one week prior to the event.

CITP Luncheon Speaker Series: Danit Gal – The Co-Evolution of Humans and Robots in East Asia: A Regional Outlook

Date and Time
Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 306
Type
CITP
Speaker
Danit Gal, from Keio University Global Research Institute
Host

Humans and technological artifacts have always been entangled in a co-evolutional relationship, where the progress of the one fuels the progress of the other in a (positive or otherwise) continuous cycle. How far can and will this cycle go when our technological artifacts become increasingly autonomous? East Asia’s rapidly developing technology ecosystem offers some intriguing answers to this question. Distinct as they are, China, Japan, and South Korea are all racing towards the creation of a digitally-enabled society by welcoming robots into their lives and homes. Why is this happening? How does it affect an increasingly fragile co-evolutionary cycle?

Bio:
Danit Gal is a project assistant professor at the Cyber Civilization Research Center at the Keio University Global Research Institute in Tokyo, Japan. She is interested in global strategic technology planning to maximize shared social benefit. Danit chairs the IEEE P7009 standard on the Fail-Safe Design of Autonomous and Semi-Autonomous Systems and sits on the executive committee of the IEEE Global Initiative for Ethical Considerations in Autonomous and Intelligent Systems. She is an affiliate at the Center for Information Technology Policy at Princeton University and associate fellow at the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence at the University of Cambridge. Prior to joining Keio, Danit was a Yenching Scholar at Peking University and international strategic advisor to the iCenter at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. Among her current projects is an ongoing study of the unanticipated consequences of conversational AI under the Association of Pacific Rim Universities – Google research project ‘AI for Everyone: Building Trust in and Benefiting from the Technology’.

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