Quick links

CITP

Hackathon - CITP and Siemens Corporate Technology FutureMakers Challenge

Date and Time
Saturday, April 28, 2018 - 8:00am to 6:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall Third (3rd) Floor Open Space
Type
CITP
Host

This event is open ONLY to pre-registered Princeton University students.

Siemens and CITP are joining forces to sponsor this Hackathon, to be held on Friday, April 13 and Saturday, April 14 in Sherrerd Hall. Siemens FutureMakers Challenge: Making Innovation to Society Real is a 24-hour challenge with a presentation/judging period following the Hackathon.

At Princeton University, participants will be working with the following topic:
Protecting industrial businesses with smart cyber threat & anomaly detection, prevention technology and analytics.

Teams should consist of 2-5 Princeton University students. All teams should have at least 1 Ph.D. student from Princeton University. First, second, and third place team members will receive prizes. Plus, there will be a 6-month research contract for winning team idea! For additional information, click here.

Hackathon Information Session

Date and Time
Wednesday, April 18, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 306
Type
CITP

CITP, along with Siemens Corporate Technology, will be hosting a hackathon for Princeton University students on Friday and Saturday, April 27-28, 2018.

Topic: Protecting industrial businesses with smart cyber threat & anomaly detection, prevention technology and analytics.

Student information sessions about the hackathon will be held on:
• Wednesday, April 18th, 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. in 306 Sherrerd Hall
• Friday, April 20th, 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. in 306 Sherrerd Hall (make-up day, only if neeeded)
Students interested in attending the information session should RSVP to Jean Butcher, butcher@princeton.edu
This hackathon requires pre-registration and will be held from 6 p.m. Friday, April 27th until 6 p.m. Saturday, April 28th in Sherrerd Hall. Siemens FutureMakers Challenge: Making Innovation to Society Real is a 24-hour challenge with a presentation/judging period following the Hackathon.

First, second, and third place team members will receive prizes. Plus, there will be a 6-month research contract for the winning team! For additional information, click here.

Hackathon - CITP and Siemens Corporate Technology FutureMakers Challenge

Date and Time
Friday, April 27, 2018 - 6:00pm to 11:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall Third (3rd) Floor Open Space
Type
CITP
Host

This event is open ONLY to pre-registered Princeton University students.

Siemens and CITP are joining forces to sponsor this Hackathon, to be held on Friday, April 13 and Saturday, April 14 in Sherrerd Hall. Siemens FutureMakers Challenge: Making Innovation to Society Real is a 24-hour challenge with a presentation/judging period following the Hackathon.

At Princeton University, participants will be working with the following topic:
Protecting industrial businesses with smart cyber threat & anomaly detection, prevention technology and analytics.

Teams should consist of 2-5 Princeton University students. All teams should have at least 1 Ph.D. student from Princeton University. First, second, and third place team members will receive prizes. Plus, there will be a 6-month research contract for winning team idea! For additional information, click here.

Siemens Corporate Technology FutureMakers Challenge Information Session

Date and Time
Wednesday, March 28, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 306
Type
CITP
Host

Princeton University students are invited to this information session to learn more about the Siemens FutureMakers Challenge: Making Innovation to Society Real.

Siemens and CITP are joining forces to sponsor this Hackathon, to be held on Friday, April 13 and Saturday, April 14 in Sherrerd Hall. Siemens FutureMakers Challenge: Making Innovation to Society Real is a 24-hour challenge with a presentation/judging period following the Hackathon.

At Princeton University, participants will be working with the following topic:
Protecting industrial businesses with smart cyber threat & anomaly detection, prevention technology and analytics.

Teams should consist of 2-5 Princeton University students. All teams should have at least 1 Ph.D. student from Princeton University. First, second, and third place team members will receive prizes. Plus, there will be a 6-month research contract for winning team idea! For additional information, click here.

RSVP here to attend the information session.

CITP Conference: AI and Ethics

Date and Time
Saturday, March 10, 2018 - 9:00am to 5:00pm
Location
Friend Center Convocation Room
Type
CITP

In fall 2017, the University Center for Human Values (UCHV) and the Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP) launched a joint initiative on Ethics and AI. This interdisciplinary series brings Princeton University faculty from the humanities, social sciences and computer science together with proprietors of AI technologies and others working in the field in order to discuss the intersection of philosophical and technical issues raised by new developments in artificial intelligence technologies. In this project, we encourage a critical and positive approach to set some parameters within which these technologies can be further developed in keeping with human values considerations and engineering feasibilities.

For lunch and a name tag register here by Monday, March 5, 2018.

Net Neutrality: What Does the Future Hold?

Date and Time
Tuesday, January 9, 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall Third (3rd) Floor Open Space
Type
CITP

The 2015 Open Internet Rules were recently repealed by the FCC on a 3-2, party-line vote. What does this mean for home Internet users? Who will protect consumers? How will the change affect innovation and entrepreneurship? Will there be more investment in broadband deployment? Will interconnection strategies change? Will information be censored for political, commercial, or other reasons? At this special panel, sponsored by the Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP), experts will talk about what to expect following the FCC vote.
 

Moderator:

Edward W. Felten is the director of CITP, the Robert E. Kahn Professor of Computer Science and Public Affairs, and the director of the Program in Technology and Society, Information Technology track at Princeton University. He served at the White House as the deputy U.S. chief technology officer from June 2015 to January 2017. Ed was also the first chief technologist for the Federal Trade Commission from January 2011 until September 2012. His research interests include computer security and privacy, and public policy issues relating to information technology. Specific topics include software security, Internet security, electronic voting, cybersecurity policy, technology for government transparency, network neutrality and Internet policy.

Ed often blogs about technology and policy at Freedom to Tinker.

Panelists:

Nick Feamster is the deputy director of CITP and a professor in the Department of Computer Science at Princeton University. Before joining the faculty at Princeton, he was a professor in the School of Computer Science at Georgia Tech. He received his Ph.D. in computer science from MIT in 2005, and his S.B. and M.Eng. degrees in electrical engineering and computer science from MIT in 2000 and 2001, respectively. He received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the Technology Review “TR35” award, a Sloan Fellowship, and the SIGCOMM Rising Star Award for his contributions to cybersecurity, notably spam filtering. His research focuses on many aspects of computer networking and networked systems, with a focus on network operations, network security, and censorship-resistant communication systems. His research interests overlap with technology policy in the areas of censorship, broadband access networks, and network security and privacy.

Joel Reidenberg is a professor at Fordham Law School where he is a leading international scholar in internet law, privacy, and cybersecurity. Reidenberg was CITP’s inaugural Microsoft Visiting Professor of Information Technology Policy for 2013-2014 and a visiting research collaborator from 2014 to 2018. While visiting CITP, he collaborated on research with the CITP community and taught an undergraduate course on internet law and policy, which he still teaches every spring for the Woodrow Wilson School. At Fordham he holds the Stanley D. and Nikki Waxberg Chair, and he is the founding academic director of the Center on Law and Information Policy. He received his A.B. from Dartmouth, J.D. from Columbia and Ph.D. from the Universite de Paris-Sorbonne.

Henning Schulzrinne, Levi Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University, received his Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, Massachusetts. He was an MTS at AT&T Bell Laboratories and an associate department head at GMD-Fokus (Berlin), before joining the Computer Science and Electrical Engineering departments at Columbia University. He served as chair of the Department of Computer Science from 2004 to 2009, as Engineering Fellow at the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in 2010 and 2011, and as chief technology officer at the FCC since 2012. He has published more than 250 journal and conference papers, and more than 70 Internet RFCs. Protocols co-developed by him, such as RTP, RTSP and SIP, are now Internet standards, used by almost all Internet telephony and multimedia applications. His research interests include Internet multimedia systems, ubiquitous computing, and mobile systems. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, has received the New York City Mayor’s Award for Excellence in Science and Technology, the VON Pioneer Award, TCCC service award, the IEEE Region 1 William Terry Award for Lifetime Distinguished Service to IEEE and the UMass Computer Science Outstanding Alumni recognition.

Special Event: Dissecting the Equifax Breach

Date and Time
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall Third (3rd) Floor Open Space
Type
CITP

On September 7, 2017, Equifax announced that it was a victim of a major data breach potentially impacting about 145.5 million U.S. consumers. CITP, in collaboration with Fordham University’s Center on Law and Information Policy, presents a panel discussion and analysis of the Equifax breach from a technological, financial, legal and regulatory perspective. Experts from each of these disciplines will discuss existing shortcomings and vulnerabilities that led to this breach, the impact of this breach and recommendations for minimizing future attacks and data breaches. 
See full event details here.

This event is open to the public.

CITP on the Road: Initiative on Artificial Intelligence and Policy

Date and Time
Friday, December 8, 2017 - 12:15pm to 2:15pm
Location
The National Press Club, 529 14th Street NW, 13th Floor, Fourth Estate Room, Washington DC 20045 (off campus)
Type
CITP

This event in Washington, DC describes the launch of CITP’s initiative on artificial intelligence, machine learning, and public policy. The initiative will examine a range of policy issues raised by artificial intelligence, including how to ensure the application of AI is fair and governable; the impact of AI on the economy and jobs; how AI will affect free expression and human rights; how to increase the diversity of the AI workforce; effects of AI on security and privacy; and so on. This event will include introductions to these policy areas from Princeton University experts, and discussion.

RSVP here by Friday, December 1st for a name tag and lunch.

Launch Event - Initiative on Artificial Intelligence and Policy

Date and Time
Thursday, October 19, 2017 - 10:00am to 3:30pm
Location
Friend Center Convocation Room
Type
CITP

Click here to RSPV for lunch and a name tag.

This event will mark the launch of CITP’s initiative on artificial intelligence, machine learning, and public policy. The initiative will examine a range of policy issues raised by artificial intelligence, including how to ensure the application of AI is fair and governable; the impact of AI on the economy and jobs; how AI will affect free expression and human rights; how to increase the diversity of the AI workforce; effects of AI on security and privacy; and so on. This launch event will include introductions to these policy areas from Princeton experts, and roundtable discussions on how to address them.

This event is sponsored by:

MacArthur Foundation Logo

How Should Digital Assistants Help People in Crisis: The Possibilities and Pitfalls of AI and Mental Health

Date and Time
Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location
Sherrerd Hall 306
Type
CITP
Speaker
Dr. Adam Miner, from Stanford University
Host
Prof. Olga Russakovsky, Center for Information Technology Policy

This talk will not be livestreamed or videotaped.

No RSVP required for current Princeton faculty, staff, and students. Open to members of the public by invitation only. Please contact Jean Butcher at b if you are interested in attending a particular lunch.

Digital assistants (e.g. Siri on the iPhone, Microsoft’s Cortana) are offering to help with driving directions, ordering food, and other daily activities. What should they say if a user asks about suicide or other health crises? As talking software plays a larger part in daily life, and interacts with vulnerable populations (e.g. youth), competence and privacy need to be proactively addressed. This talk focuses on the social, technical, and policy opportunities for conversational AI to recognize and respond to health crises.

Dr. Miner is an AI psychologist, whose research addresses policy issues in the use, design, and regulation of conversational AI in health. In service to improving access to high quality mental health care, Dr. Miner’s research and collaborations focus on allowing digital assistants to recognize, respect, and respond to health issues through controlled and naturalistic studies.

Dr. Miner is an instructor in Stanford’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and KL2 fellow in epidemiology and clinical research, with active collaborations in computer science, biomedical informatics, and communication. He was previously a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford’s Clinical Excellence Research Center (CERC), using human-centered design to create new models of health care delivery to safely reduce national health spending and improve access to care. He obtained his doctorate in clinical psychology from the PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium.

Dr. Miner has provided mental health services at Stanford’s Department of Psychiatry, Stanford’s Chronic Pain Clinic, the US Department of Veterans Affairs, and the San Francisco jail system. His research has been featured on NPR, The New York Times, CNN, The Washington Post, ABC, and The Onion.

Follow us: Facebook Twitter Linkedin