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Seminar

LIVING MATERIALS - Materials at the Interface Between Technology and Life Sciences

Date and Time
Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Location
Friend Center 008
Type
Seminar
Speaker
Fiorenzo Omenetto, from Tufts University

EE Departmental Seminars

Abstract:
Structural proteins are Nature’s building blocks, conferring stiffness, structure, and function to ordinarily soft biological materials. Such proteins are polymorphic which allows controlling the end material format through their self-assembly. These biomaterials provide a unique opportunity by being simultaneously “technological” (e.g. mechanically robust, micro- and nanostructured, high-performing) and “biological” (e.g. living, adaptable, bio-functional) making them ideally suited for applications at the interface between these two domains. 
 
Bio:
Fiorenzo G. Omenetto is the Frank C. Doble Professor of Engineering, and a Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Tufts University.  He also holds appointments in the Department of Physics and the Department of Electrical Engineering. His research interests are at the interface of technology, biologically inspired materials and the natural sciences with an emphasis on new transformative approaches for sustainable materials for high-technology applications.  He also serves as Dean for Research for the School of Engineering. He has proposed and pioneered the use of silk as a material platform for advanced technology with uses in photonics, optoelectronics and nanotechnology applications, is co-inventor on several disclosures (~100) on the subject, and is actively investigating applications of this technology base both for technical and design applications.  He is a co-founder of three startups and has active roles in their governance.
Prof. Omenetto was formerly a J. Robert Oppenheimer Fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratories, a Guggenheim Fellow, and is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America and of the American Physical Society and a Senior Member of SPIE and is a Tallberg Foundation Global Leadership Fellow.  He was named one of the 50 top people in tech by Fortune magazine in a class including (among others) Steve Jobs, Jeff Bezos, Larry Page, Shigeru Miyamoto.  His research has been featured extensively in the press with coverage in the most important media outlets worldwide.

Harnessing Synthetic Quantum Matter

Date and Time
Monday, February 26, 2018 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Location
Engineering Quadrangle B205
Type
Seminar
Speaker
Alexey Gorshkov, from University of Maryland

EE Departmental Seminars

Abstract:
Recent advances in condensed matter, optical, and atomic physics led to the emergence of highly controllable synthetic quantum matter, such as superconducting circuits, implanted solid-state defects, trapped atoms or ions, and strongly interacting photons. In addition to allowing us to gain fundamental insights into peculiar and diverse behavior of many-body -- that is, large and interacting -- quantum systems, synthetic quantum matter paves the way for building revolutionary quantum technologies such as extraordinarily powerful computers, unbreakably secure communication devices, and exceptionally accurate sensors. In this talk, we will explore two facets of synthetic quantum matter. First, we will argue that sampling complexity, that is the question of how hard it is to produce a sample from a given probability distribution, lies at the heart of understanding and harnessing synthetic quantum matter. Second, we will show how to engineer interactions between individual photons and use these interactions for building quantum technologies and accessing exotic few-body and many-body physics. Finally, we will put this work in the context of a broader quest to design, understand, control, and harness synthetic quantum matter. 

Bio:
Alexey Gorshkov received his A.B. and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard in 2004 and 2010, respectively. In 2013, after three years as a Lee A. DuBridge Postdoctoral Scholar at Caltech, he became a staff physicist at NIST. At the same time, he started his own research group at the University of Maryland, where he is a fellow of the Joint Quantum Institute and of the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science. His theoretical research is at the interface of quantum optics, atomic physics, condensed matter physics, and quantum information science. Applications of his research include quantum computing, quantum communication, and quantum sensing.

You have to be brilliant to do that! Cultures of Brilliance and Academic Gender Gaps

Date and Time
Wednesday, February 3, 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location
Andlinger Center Maeder Hall
Type
Seminar
Host
SEAS-sponsored Seminar, http://www.princeton.edu/engineering/

You have to be brilliant to do that!
Many academic fields, including engineering and computer science, have persistent gender gaps despite attempts to encourage women’s participation. While this is often characterized as a problem faced by STEM fields, some humanities disciplines such as philosophy face precisely the same challenges, while some STEM disciplines such as molecular biology are far more gender-balanced. Are there any isolable factors that predict the occurrence of gender gaps across the entire academic spectrum? This talk presents data suggesting that one such factor may be academics' beliefs about what is required for success in their discipline. In some fields, success is viewed primarily as a matter of hard work and dedication -- but in others, success is seen as requiring a special, unteachable spark of brilliance. Cultural stereotypes strongly associate this sort of raw genius with men rather than women -- where are the female Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Houses, or Will Huntings? -- meaning that women may be discouraged from pursuing careers in such fields. These findings point to new strategies for increasing women’s participation in STEM, and indicate concrete measures that might be implemented in SEAS classrooms to better include and encourage women students.

Interference Rendered Significantly Harmless

Date and Time
Friday, December 12, 2008 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm
Location
Peyton Hall 145
Type
Seminar
Speaker
Ramakrishna Gummadi, from MIT
Host
Jennifer Rexford
Abstract: The throughput of existing wireless networks is often limited by interference. One fundamental reason is that the current designs are constrained by a "one-transmission-at-a-time" model at the link layer and a fixed-width spectrum allocation at the physical layer. We present a new wireless design that exploits traffic burstiness and node heterogeneity, thereby improving concurrency and spectrum usage. The main challenge is the unmanaged nature of many wireless networks such as 802.11 and mesh, which makes centralized resource allocation impractical. We show through analysis and implementation that simple randomized allocation policies can overcome this challenge, and improve throughput by 2x or more.

This work is joint with Rabin Patra, Hari Balakrishnan and Eric Brewer.

Bio: Ramakrishna Gummadi is a post-doc at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratoray (CSAIL). He obtained his B.Tech. from IIT-Madras, M.S. from UC Berkeley and Ph.D. from USC, all in Computer Science. His dissertation was about reliable and efficient programming languages for sensor networks. He is interested in building scalable and reliable systems and networks based on sound principles. His awards include a UC Regents Graduate Fellowship, a best paper awarded out of all 2001 Journal of Computer Networks papers, a best poster/demo award at SenSys 2004, and an award at the ACM Student Research Competition (SRC) held at PLDI 2007.

The Barrelfish OS for Hetergeneous Multicore Systems

Date and Time
Friday, December 5, 2008 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm
Location
Friend Center 013
Type
Seminar
Speaker
Timothy Roscoe
Host
Larry Peterson
The Barrelfish OS is a new open-source operating system for heterogeneous multicore systems being developed at ETH Zurich, in conjunction with Microsoft Research in Cambridge.

This talk will say why we think we can write a new OS, and why we think we should. Hand-in-hand with increasing hardware parallelism is increasing hardware diversity, even within a single machine. Furthermore, the drive towards multicore programmability is beginning to result in interesting language and runtime features whose I/O and scheduling requirements may not be well served by existing OS structure.

Barrelfish seeks to meet these challenges by viewing a multicore machine more as a networked system than as a single, monolithic computer, and applying results from distributed computing to scaling a single OS instance across many heterogeneous cores. We also apply knowledge representation techniques to allow the OS and applications to reason about the richness of the hardware at runtime, in the interests of continuous performance optimization. I'll talk about how these approaches lead to a novel way of structuring an OS, and the current status and future directions of the system. ork).ABSTRACT: The Barrelfish OS is a new open-source operating system for heterogeneous multicore systems being developed at ETH Zurich, in conjunction with Microsoft Research in Cambridge. This talk will say why we think we can write a new OS, and why we think we should. Hand-in-hand with increasing hardware parallelism is increasing hardware diversity, even within a single machine. Furthermore, the drive towards multicore programmability is beginning to result in interesting language and runtime features whose I/O and scheduling requirements may not be well served by existing OS structure. Barrelfish seeks to meet these challenges by viewing a multicore machine more as a networked system than as a single, monolithic computer, and applying results from distributed computing to scaling a single OS instance across many heterogeneous cores. We also apply knowledge representation techniques to allow the OS and applications to reason about the richness of the hardware at runtime, in the interests of continuous performance optimization. I'll talk about how these approaches lead to a novel way of structuring an OS, and the current status and future directions of the system.

Director

Date and Time
Monday, November 7, 2005 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location
Computer Science Small Auditorium (Room 105)
Type
Seminar
Speaker
Chris Johnson, from Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, School of Computing, University of Utah
Host
Jaswinder Singh
Computing the Future of Biomedicine

Computers have changed the way we live, work, and even recreate.

Now, they are transforming how we think about and treat human disease.

Advanced techniques in biomedical computing, imaging, and visualization are already changing the face of biology and medicine in both research and clinical practice. These techniques have the potential to provide comprehensive models and views of the human body in unprecedented depth and detail. As a result, biomedical computing and visualization will help produce exciting new biomedical scientific discoveries and clinical treatments. In this talk, I will discuss the state of the art in biomedical computing, medical imaging, and visualization research and present examples of their vital roles in cardiology, neuroscience, neurosurgery, and radiology.

Grid Computing and Foundational Certified Code

Date and Time
Friday, April 16, 2004 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Location
Friend Center 013
Type
Seminar
Speaker
Karl Crary, from Carnegie Mellon University
Host
Andrew Appel
Grid computing seeks to harness idle computing power on the Internet to create a huge supercomputer available to the public. Many obstacles exist to making this vision a reality; a primary obstacle is the understandable reluctance of computer owners to execute code from sources they do not trust. This obstacle limits participation in the grid to the small number who can afford to cultivate pre-arranged trust relationships for their applications.

The ConCert project seeks to make the grid universally usable by eliminating the need for trust when disseminating applications. This is achieved using certified code to ensure that grid applications comply with a safety policy. However, certified code can raise other obstacles to universal usability. In particular, if a safety policy is overly specific, it may unnecessarily limit the number of applications that can comply, and therefore limit the number that can use the grid.

This talk discusses our work to resolve this issue through foundational certified code, wherein the safety policy is as general as possible. Foundational certified code has been infamously difficult to work with, as its certificates must include complete (and typically complicated) safety arguments to the level of the concrete architecture that tend. We discuss our system, called TALT, which employs a unique methodology based in metalogic and operational semantics that ameliorates these difficulties.

(This is joint work with Susmit Sarkar.)

Extracting Biological Information from Genome-Scale Experimentation

Date and Time
Monday, February 16, 2004 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location
McDonnell Hall A01
Type
Seminar
Speaker
David Botstein, from Genomics Institute, Princeton University

An Overview of Microsoft Research Silicon Valley

Date and Time
Monday, February 9, 2004 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location
Computer Science Small Auditorium (Room 105)
Type
Seminar
Speaker
Lintao Zhang, from Microsoft Research
Host
Kai Li
In this talk we will give a brief description of the organization of Microsoft Research and its role in Microsoft. In particular, we will discuss some of the on-going projects in MSR Silicon Valley lab, the newest lab of Microsoft Research which focuses on distributed system research. These projects range from anti-spam to specification and verification to distributed storage systems. MSR-SV is constantly looking for talented people and we hope this talk will give prospect candidates a picture of the on-going research activities in MSR-SV

An Infrastructure for Compilers and Programming Tools

Date and Time
Thursday, February 13, 2003 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location
Friend Center 013
Type
Seminar
Speaker
David Tarditi, from Microsoft Research
Host
Andrew Appel
Microsoft is building a next-generation compiler infrastructure that will be the basis for Microsoft's product compilers and other programming tools and a research platform as well. This project, code-named Phoenix, is a joint effort between the Developer Platforms Division and Microsoft Research. The general idea is to build a set of compiler building blocks that are unified using a common intermediate representation. The blocks will be composed to derive various compiler configurations and to support programming tools. The challenge is to span a range of input languages, target architectures, compiler configurations and to produce a useful research platform. We have assembled a team with experience in these different areas. In this talk, I'll give a high-level overview of the project, discussing goals, input languages, target architectures, compilation models, ideas for making it available as a research platform, and progress to date. The intermediate representation is still a work-in-progress, so I will only be giving a general overview of it. I will also discuss some research topics that my group plans to investigate using Phoenix as a research platform.
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